Parents: 5 Reasons Your Family Should Volunteer

5 Reasons Your Family Should Volunteer

Get up. Get kids ready for school. Get them to the bus on time. Get to work. Squeeze in a few errands at lunch. Pick up kids after school. Shuttle kids to and from soccer practice. Or volleyball. Or dance. Or Girls on the Run. Get home. Whip something together for dinner. Help kids with homework. Watch the news. Crash.

In this day and age it can seem almost impossible to find time to have a meal together as a family, let alone find time to do community service. That doesn’t mean it’s not important, though. Here are 5 reasons why cramming just one more thing in might really pay off in the long run (http://www.serviceleader.org/instructors/studentpaper7#3a).

1)    Kids who volunteer make better decisions – when kids volunteer for just an hour a week, it cuts their risk of early alcohol consumption and other risky behaviors like skipping school in half.

2)    Volunteering enhances children’s development – kids who volunteer show increased psychological (e.g., increased self-confidence), social (e.g., better social skills), and intellectual development (e.g., better learners)

3)    Kids who volunteer gain valuable life skills – volunteers show greater responsibility for task completion, punctuality, reliability, good grooming, and ability to get along with others

4)    The community benefits – many non-profits count on volunteers to make their programs successful. After all, where would Girls on the Run be without its coaches and running buddies? Kids who volunteer report an increased sense of community and a feeling that, even as a kid, they can make a powerful difference in someone’s life

5)    Volunteering encourages service ethic – kids who volunteer turn into adults who volunteer. In addition, kids who volunteer become more civically minded adults.

But remember, you can’t just shuffle your kids off to volunteer, drop them off, and come back later to pick them up. Actions speak louder than words. You are your child’s best role model. So get the whole family together and rake up your neighbor’s leaves, help build a new playground at your child’s school, or go visit folks at a nursing home. Make a difference in someone’s life, and you might find yourself surprised at just how much they make a difference in yours.

Stayed tuned for next week’s topic: What to do now that GOTR is finished for the season

For more information on this week’s topic, go to:

http://kidshealth.org/parent/positive/family/volunteer.html

http://www.bloganthropy.org/2010/11/9-expert-tips-for-teaching-children-about-giving-and-volunteering/

http://www.classb.com/blog/2010/11/16/teaching-kids-and-teens-about-volunteering-part-1-the-benefits/

http://www.helpguide.org/life/volunteer_opportunities_benefits_volunteering.htm

How Can I Help GOTR for the spring season?

For our full wish list, please see: https://gotrboise.wordpress.com/wish-list/

 

Advertisements
This entry was posted in For Parents and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.